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Lalique 100 Points Stemware

"Beautiful yet functional", 100 Points is a hand-made glass that exemplifies the established traditional and style of Lalique but embraces a modern design and precise utility. Designed in partnership with internationally acclaimed wine critic James Suckling, the collection's name refers to the wine scoring system. Its distinctive frosted rib stem creates a characteristic contrast of clear and satin-finish.

Available in Store Only
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Available for Backorder
Expected to ship in 4-6 weeks
Call us at 1-800-793-6670 or send us a message for more information
In Stock & Ready to Ship
Grouped product items
Selection
100 POINTS WINE TASTING GLASS
100 Points Carafe
100 Points Small Tumbler, Pair
100 Points Burgundy
100 Points Goblet
100 Points Shot Glasses, Set of 4
100 Points Large Tumbler, Pair
100 Points Flute
100 Points Bordeaux
100 Points Coupe Champagne
100 POINTS Champagne Flute, Pair
100 POINTS Champagne Flute, Pair Available for Backorder
$330.00
100 POINTS Bordeaux, Pair
100 POINTS Bordeaux, Pair Available for Backorder
$370.00
100 Points Decanter
Some Items Available for Backorder
Expected to ship in 4-6 weeks
Call us at 1-800-793-6670 or send us a message for more information
More Information
Material Crystal
SKU group-100-Points-Stemware
Details & Care Hand Wash Only

René Lalique’s factory begun production in 1922 in the village of Wingen-sur-Moder in Alsace, a region of France with has strong glassmaking traditions. Throughout the decades, artists and craftsmen have created exceptional pieces inspired by three themes dear to René Lalique: women, flora and fauna. The exceptional know-how includes a succession of manual operations with extreme attention given to details and finishing of each sculpture. Some large or artistic pieces are still manufactured with the ‘lost-wax’ technique, used by René Lalique until 1930, consisting in the use of single-use molds in plaster instead of cast-iron molds.